Gluten Allergy interview with Douglas Samuel

From Allergy Details.com

What are some of the differences between celiac disease, and
gluten allergy?

Celiac disease is a genetic disorder. It causes the lining of the intestine to break down if you eat gluten. This is not an allergy.

Strictly speaking, a gluten allergy is a type-I food sensitivity. Specific reactions are triggered in the immune system, causing anaphylactic symptoms such as tingling lips (mild) right through to swollen air-ways and difficulty in breathing.

Many people have a sensitivity to gluten, meaning they have unpleasant symptoms caused by ingesting gluten, but it is not celiac or the classic definition of an allergy. This is still called a “gluten allergy” by many people.

What are the common symptoms of wheat allergy?

Bloating, diarrhea and constipation are very common.. Skin problems are also common such as eczema are also very common..

Sometimes the less common symptoms of allergy are overlooked,
what symptoms of wheat allergy are less common?

It is hard to answer this since different people have different symptoms for the same allergy or food sensitivity.

I think that when it comes to food allergies, a lot of people focus on gastrointestinal problems.

Watch out for other symptoms as well. A common one is fatigue, and yet it is easy to overlook. You could blame being tired on stress, lack of sleep, or any number of other causes, and those are all legitimate causes. Allergies can also cause fatigue, and can cause poor sleep and stress as well.

Ringing ears, headaches and forgetfulness are some other symptoms to look out for that many people may not watch out for.

How long did it take, after going on a gluten free diet, for you
to start and feeling better?

This is a very good question. For me it took about three weeks. If ever I accidentally ingest wheat, I find the first week is terrible, the second bad, and by the third week I am starting to feel OK. But it really take six to eight weeks to become totally normal and recovered again.

Some people feel better in much less time, others take longer.

Often food allergies lead people to discover new and different foods.
What are some alternative grains you have discovered?

A few of my favorite alternative grains are quinoa, amaranth and teff. They taste great all on their own, or combined and are very nutritious and satisfying.

Some other grains that replace wheat are millet, rice, corn … there are many too choose from.

Still, nothing replaces the gluten in wheat, which makes baking a challenge. You can still bake great food with alternative grains and legumes.

For someone who is newly diagnosed, what quick snack ideas do
you suggest?

My favorite quick snack is hummus and rice crackers.

Snacks don’t have to be complicated – simple ones are also the most health, like nuts and fruit (dried or fresh).

What are the most surprising places you have found gluten?

The most surprising place is potatoes chips. Almost as surprising, and even more annoying is French fries in restaurants. Why do they have to ruin what should be gluten-free?

One thing I’ve noticed is that food that should be wheat-free and isn’t is of much lower quality than the real thing.

Potato chips that have wheat added are just not as good as sliced and deep-fried potatoes, although some people get used to processed food and seem to prefer it.

Processed food is bad for your health though, so having a gluten allergy is not so bad after all. It forces you to eat and enjoy good food!

One of the most challenging things for some one with food allergies
is eating out. Do you have advice, for someone with gluten allergy
wishing to eat out at a restaurant?

Yes, this is very important.

My number-one recommendation is to be prepared to leave the restaurant if you do not have confidence in them. That way you are already prepared before you go in.

Ask open-ended questions. Never ask leading questions like “this doesn’t have wheat in it, does it?” The right answer to that question is obviously “yes” and some waiters will give you the “right” answer (but inaccurate) answer rather than the truth. This is usually because the don’t know the answer, and don’t understand how important an allergy avoidance diet is.

Know what the likely suspects are such as soups and breads. Ask them if they have any bread you can eat. The answer in most cases is no, so if they say yes, find out more. Either they really do have wheat-free bread, or they don’t know what they are talking about. If the latter, leave!

What new things are happening at Allergy Details?

The most exciting project in the works is a set of teleseminars we will be hosting about the allergies and emotions.

Having allergies can be a very emotionally charged experience for some people. Handled incorrectly, this can make your life more difficult and your symptoms worse. Handled correctly, and you will find life much easier and this may even reduce the severity of symptoms for some types of food intolerance.

This has not been officially announced yet, not even on my own site – you heard it here first! If you want to be informed about this group counseling series, sign up for the Allergy-Details newsletter where full details will be announced. You can also check the home page of Allergy-Details.com for announcements.



Allergy Details.com







Other Interviews

Jenny Kales author The NEW Nut-Free Mom: A Crash Course in Caring for Your Nut-Allergic Child

Sarah Prye author Food Allergies on the High Seas

Sharon Chisvin author of The Girl WHo Cannot Eat Peanut Butter

Sue Ganz - Schmitt author of Princess and the Peanut: A Royally Allergic Tale

Carla Burke author of My Name May Be Peanuts, But I say Nay to PB & J

Bridget Batson author of Jude the Dude The Peanut Allergic Kid

Amy Recob author of The Bug a Bees Friends with Food Allergies

Heather Mehra and Kerry Manama authors of The No Biggie Bunch

Ginger Carter Miller.htm Gluten Free in Georgia blogger

Iris Shamus founder Allermates

Sharon Rosen Live Corn Free Blogger

Jeff Edner Owner Dairy Free Market

Sarah Hatfield No Whey Mama blogger




GLUTEN FREE
RECIPIES
Gluten Free
Stuffing recipies

Douglas Samual
BY
Allergy Details

HOME
Avoiding
Milk
Protein


Celiac and
Wheat free blogs



Wheat and Gluten
free food list



GF On Line Shops

Celiac
Support Groups



Celiac links


Celiac friendly
restaurants



History of
allergies



Gluten free
beer



Allergy and
Celiac Restaurant
Cards





GLUTEN FREE
RECIPIES
Gluten Free
Stuffing recipies

BY
Douglas Samual
Allergy Details

HOME
Avoiding
Milk
Protein


Celiac and
Wheat free blogs



Wheat and Gluten
free food list



Celiac
Support Groups



Celiac links


Celiac friendly
restaurants



History of
allergies



Gluten free
beer



Allergy and
Celiac Restaurant
Cards